10 Things You Didn’t Know about Daylight Saving Time

Whether you embrace it or brace for it, Daylight Saving Time (DST) ends for 2020 on Sunday, Nov. 1, when we turn our clocks back an hour at 2 a.m. If we look on the bright side, we gain in sleep what we lose in daylight hours--at least for one luxurious day. The springtime shift is more likely to mess us up—read on for more about that. Here are 10 fun facts that shed some light on why we change our clocks and what really happens when we try to fool Mother Nature. It is actually “Daylight Saving Time” (singular), not “Daylight Savings Time” (plural). Credit for DST is erroneously given to Founding Father and inventor Benjamin Franklin from his essay “An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light” in The Journal of Paris. The actual originator was British-born New Zealand entomologist George Vernon Hudson in 1895, who wanted to gain extra daylight to collect and study bugs.  There is no international standard for DST, which is observed by about 70 countries, excluding China and Japan. Many countries near the equator do not adjust their clocks. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 established the system of uniform DST throughout [...]